Donnelly Canada

Recording the memories

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Tierworker Ceidhle House (June 13, 2010)

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The contributors to DonnellyCanada and Heritage Tierworker continue to provide opinions, comments, and literature references that will interest those with connections to Tierworker. Here are a few:

Matt Carolan in a recent email says - "I liked the story that lady in New Zeland told you; that's exactly what went in the Ireland of the eighteen hundreds; I guess we are lucky we left later; I contacted Anna Ryan if she could get some local people and compile all the inscriptions in Moybolgue cemetery and put them on the web like she did with Moynalty and the old cemetery in Mullagh; ........  told her I will gladly help finance it ........... it would be nice to remember all the old folks we knew interred there ...... I don't believe that's finnegan's (Finegan's) pub as far as I remember (Refer to photos posted on Blog June 6, 2010) .. "

Peter Martin draws attention to a paper written by Professor Seamus MacGabhann entitled

Landmarks of the people: Meath and Cavan places prominent in Lughnasa mythology and folklore

The link is

http://eprintsprod.nuim.ie/770/1/Landsmarks.pdf

It is written in the academic style and makes references to several events and locations in the townlands around Tierworker, including Bilberry Sunday and The Fair of Muff.

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The Eyes That Shone - from Ireland to Canada in the 1950s

But a word of warning! The Eyes That Shone is not a saga filled with horrible tragedy and dysfunctional relationships, but rather a celebration of family lives in Ireland and Canada, in other words, a happy story featuring:

  • Memories of life on small farms in Ireland before 1950 and before tractors and electrification, when growing food depended largely on human sweat and muscle
  • Recollections about people and events in the Department of Public Works of Canada where the author worked during the period 1957 to 1991
  • Intimate perspectives on living and dying, politics and religion, home and family